Modern Hebrew

Music Monday … “Raq Od Yom”

Okay, this title sounds like I’ve found something nobody knows.

It isn’t like this. Sadly. The song I chose for my “return of Theaterkind”-edition of Music Monday is a song probably every musical theatre person knows – it’s “Just Another Day” from Next to Normal. In a language that may sound weird or unusual for most people: Hebrew. The (quite illegal) clip I have found is from the biggest and probably most prestigious theatre in Israel – the HaBima Theatre in Tel Aviv, which by the way is quite a sight from the outside alone.

As posts from the beginning of this blog, from before it was a musical theatre blog, suggest Hebrew is my third language (well….technically my fith, Latin and my all-forgotten knowledge of French don’t count) – and that’s part of why I like this version.

It sounds unusual and unknown and special – in my opinion.

What do you think?
Do you have any favourites in unusual languages? I’d be delighted to read about them in the comments or on my facebook page!

Happy Monday!

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The “Why Hebrew?”-Confession

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Since my first semester at university there is one question asked the most:
Why are you studying Hebrew?

I like to answer: Because it was possible.
Of course that is not even close to a ‚nice’ answer. I mean, I wouldn’t like getting that answer at all if I were the one asking. But it gives a nice hint to what my motivation was.
In the very beginning I wasn’t like: Wow, I love the middle east!
Or even: I like the forms of theatre they have in Israel – so let’s learn Hebrew to understand them!
I was more like: Well, they have nice a nice alphabet. Let’s try that!

To be honest I bought one of these study-by-yourself books for Hebrew and I taught myself some (VERY little) when I was about 16, but I basically forgot everything before I started learning Hebrew at university.

My university offers a very small minor-programme for Hebrew language only (which otherwise is a part oft he Judaism-major-programme) and a friend of mine (whom I got to know in a Hebrew intensive after my third semester) and myself we are – as far as I know – the only ones who started that programme and are still doing it.

So I enrolled in that programme because it seemed appealing.
In the first two semester I had Hebrew class three times a week. In the early mornings, in the 8 to 10 am slot – after I spend a year working in theatres and slowly teaching my brain not to work before 10 am. Yay. But somehow I did well. First semester modern Hebrew (Ivrit) and I so loved. I fell in love with that language like right from the start! (after I kind of checked how to read that – without the vowels and stuff….)

Second semester biblical Hebrew. That was even better in some parts because – hey, the stories are much better, weirder, funnier. J

From the third semester on I had a different teacher and only one class a week. (which was – actually good, because I kind of didn’t like that teacher…), modern Hebrew again.

After my third semester I took a Hebrew intensive class for three weeks, five days a week for hours a day taught by two Israelis, one constantly living in Berlin, the other one living in Haifa and coming over fot teaching….In that intensive I kind of first started speaking Hebrew (because I tend to not speak a foreign language until I know I can speak like five proper sentences unless someone makes my speaking). That was last spring. Two and a half months later I travelled to Israel for the first time with a German-Israeli youth exchange (yes, for them I’m still „youth“….well….) and I had plans to spend August completely in Israel.

I really wanted to enroll in the August intensive programme Hebrew at University of Haifa. But before I did so I applied for a scholarship programme provided by my hometown university and the DAAD. I got the scholarship – the money they gave me covered basically the tuition and housing fee at Haifa – and so I was able to spend a month in Israel, three and a half weeks at Haifa University in a lovely class in Rama ה with the best class mates. We were the only class in that programm consisting of girls only with the only male teacher in the programme. I guess especially during the last week or so our Doron had a hard time with us, but we had fun. And I learned a lot.

But now I’m like: Have I ever been able to speak Hebrew? Did I ever know that language?(because I don’t have to take Hebrew anymore at my university, I could my Haifa class get count)

To conclude and write something suiting the headline: I still don’t know why I had the feeling of needing to study Hebrew, but here I am and I love it. (not the My-Hebrew-is-bad-stuff, but the I-know-Hebrew-stuff….) 😉